Home Modification Resources

Factors Predicting Assistive Device Use in the Home by Older People Following Rehabilitation

LAURA N. GITLIN, PhD
Thomas Jefferson University
RUTH L. SCHEMM, EdD, OTR/L
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy & Science
LISA LANDSBERG, Med
Medical College of Pennsylvania
DESIREE BURGH, Med
Thomas Jefferson University

The purpose of this article is to (a) describe the pattern of assistive device use by older adults the first 3 months home following rehabilitation, (b) examine factors that predict home use, and (c) describe characteristics of users. The study involved 86 patients 55 years of age or older who were hospitalized for a stroke, orthopedic deficit, or lower limb amputation and discharged home with assistive devices. Of the 642 devices provided in the hospital, 50% were used frequently to always, with those using devices in Month 1 continuing over time. A respondent's expectation while hospitalized to use devices was an independent predictor of actual home use. Although there were no differences between users and nonusers among sociodemographic variables, respondents with a lower limb amputation used devices with greater frequency than those with either a stroke or orthopedic deficit.

Published in:
JOURNAL OF AGING AND HEALTH, Vol. 8 No. 4, November 1996, 554-575. © 1996 Sage Publications, Inc.

 

A project of the National Resource Center on Supportive Housing and Home Modification,
in affiliation with the Fall Prevention Center of Excellence, funded by the Archstone Foundation.
Located at the University of Southern California Andrus Gerontology Center, Los Angeles, California 90089-0191 (213) 740-1364.